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Friday, June 23, 2017
   
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Stay Safe and Healthy This Summer

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Temporary Restaurant Application/Information

Summer is here. If your club or organization is serving food at any event, stop by for a temporary permit package. Package includes food safety and booth set up requirements along with some freebies to get you started.

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The temperatures are rising and the days are getting longer. It′s summertime once again. Here are some tips to help make your summer the best, and healthiest, one yet.

Grill and Chill

Whether you prefer burgers off the grill or a picnic in the park, one thing you don’t want on the menu this summer is food borne illness. Take these steps to help keep germs at bay.

Wash your hands before and after handling food.

When taking foods off the grill, do not put cooked food items back on the same plate that previously held raw food.

When grilling foods, preheat the coals on your grill for 20 to 30 minutes, or until the coals are lightly coated with ash.

Use a meat thermometer to ensure that food reaches a safe internal temperature.

Never let raw meat, cooked food or cut fresh fruits or vegetables sit at room temperature more than two hours before putting them in the cooler or refrigerator (one hour when the temperature is above 90°F).

Make sure to pack plenty of extra ice or freezer packs in your cooler to ensure a constant cold temperature. Beat the Heat Heat-related illnesses claim the lives of hundreds of people each year, so it is important to take these precautions when working or playing outside during the hot summer months.

Drink plenty of water or other non-alcoholic beverages

Wear lightweight, loose-fitting clothing that is light in color;

Reduce strenuous activities or do them during the cooler parts of the day.

 

Fun in the Sun

Your summer plans may include hitting the beach, or just spending more time outdoors. Make sure you plan to avoid sunburn, which can increase your risk of skin cancer.

Seek shade, especially during midday hours (10 a.m. to 4 p.m.), when UV rays are strongest and do the most damage.

Cover up with clothing to protect exposed skin. Along-sleeved shirt and long pants with a tight weave are best.

Wear a hat with a wide brim to shade the face, head, ears, and neck.

Grab shades that wrap around and block as close to 100% of both UVA and UVB rays as possible.

Rub on sunscreen with sun protective factor (SPF) 15 or higher, and both UVA and UVB protection.


Swim Safe

Swimming is a fun way to stay cool and be active. Before diving in, make sure you know these tips for staying healthy and safe while swimming.

Avoid swallowing pool water or even getting it in your mouth.

Shower before swimming and wash your hands after using the toilet or changing diapers.

Take children on bathroom breaks or check diapers often.

Keep an eye on children at all times. Kids can drown in seconds and in silence.

Never swim alone or in unsupervised locations. Teach children to always swim with a buddy.

Don’t use air-filled swimming aids (such as “water wings”) with children in place of life jackets or life preservers. For More Information 1-800-CDC-INFOhttp://www.cdc.gov/

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Lyme Disease Awareness Month

Symptoms

By Mayo Clinic Staff

The signs and symptoms of Lyme disease vary and usually affect more than one system. The skin, joints and nervous system are affected most often.

Early signs and symptoms

These signs and symptoms may occur within a month after you've been infected:

· Rash. A small, red bump may appear at the site of the tick bite. This small bump is normal after a tick bite and doesn't indicate Lyme disease. However, over the next few days, the redness may expand forming a rash in a bull's-eye pattern, with a red outer ring surrounding a clear area. The rash, called erythema migrans, is one of the hallmarks of Lyme disease. Some people develop this rash at more than one place on their bodies.

· Flu-like symptoms. Fever, chills, fatigue, body aches and a headache may accompany the rash.

Later signs and symptoms

In some people, the rash may spread to other parts of the body and, several weeks to months after you've been infected, you may experience:

· Joint pain. You may develop bouts of severe joint pain and swelling. Your knees are especially likely to be affected, but the pain can shift from one joint to another.

· Neurological problems. Weeks, months or even years after you were infected, you may experience inflammation of the membranes surrounding your brain (meningitis), temporary paralysis of one side of your face (Bell's palsy), numbness or weakness in your limbs, and impaired muscle movement.

Less common signs and symptoms

Several weeks after infection, some people develop:

· Heart problems, such as an irregular heartbeat. Heart problems rarely last more than a few days or weeks.

· Eye inflammation.

· Liver inflammation (hepatitis).

· Severe fatigue.

When to see a doctor

If you've been bitten by a tick and experience symptoms

Only a minority of deer tick bites leads to Lyme disease. The longer the tick remains attached to your skin, the greater your risk of getting the disease. If you think you've been bitten and experience signs and symptoms of Lyme disease — particularly if you live in an area where Lyme disease is prevalent — contact your doctor immediately. Treatment for Lyme disease is most effective if begun early.

 

See your doctor even if symptoms disappear
It's important to consult your doctor even if signs and symptoms disappear because the absence of symptoms doesn't mean the disease is gone. Left untreated, Lyme disease can spread to other parts of your body from several months to years after infection — causing arthritis and nervous system problems. Ticks also can transmit other illnesses, such as babesiosis and Colorado tick fever.

 

 

DHS. WISCONSIN.GOV

FACT SHEET ON OUR NEW WEBSITE

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services has upgraded our website to better serve Wisconsin citizens. Our agency meets many different needs-but as a whole we are here to protect and promote the health and safety of the people of Wisconsin. A modern, well‐designed, and more responsive website will help us to achieve that.

We are using a web development tool called Drupal that has been adopted widely across both business and government. Drupal is an open source web content management system with an active development community. In other words, it is a free tool for building websites that has caught on as a practical and innovative solution worldwide.

The user experience is extremely important to us, and this upgrade has allowed us to greatly improve it.

**We studied how people navigate and why they come to   the website-and applied what we learned. Overall, visitors to our website should find it less complicated to browse, search, and find what they want.

**We are also using best practices for design. The new look is uncluttered and easier on the user's eyes.

**Our website is now optimized for mobile, which means you can view our site on any device with ease.

**We continue our ongoing agency commitment to accessibility and compliance with federal regulation, sec

 

Our Mission

The Iron County Wisconsin Health Department is here to serve the residents of Iron County Wisconsin by promoting health, protecting the enviroment, and preventing disease and injury.

 

 

 

 

Office Information

Department Head: Katie Hampston, BSN, RN
Address:
502 Copper Street
Suite 2
Hurley, WI 54534
Phone: 715-561-2191
Toll Free: 888-561-2191
Fax: 715-561-2836
Office Hours: 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM
   

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