Saturday, September 22, 2018
   
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Strong Women Community Programs

Strong Women Classes Starting Dates are:

Hurley ... September 11, 2018

Wakefield ... September 18, 2018

Springstead ... On going classes

For more information about our programs click on the Evidence-base Prevent Programs Scroll down to Strong Women Programs.

 

This flu season, get a flu Vaccine

Flu season usually starts in October and continues through the winter months with peak activity in January and February. Vaccination is the best way to prevent influenza.

The Iron County Health Department located on 502 Copper Street is offering flu vaccination at our

Walk - in clinic held

October 3rd

From 8:00 am to 12:00 pm

You may also get your flu vaccination by scheduling an appointment by calling the Iron County Health Department at 715-561-2191.

 

In addition to the flu vaccine, practicing good hand hygiene, avoiding contact with those who are ill, and avoiding touching your face, nose and mouth are good protective measures against getting the flu.

Get Vaccinated

This is what the CDC has to say about the Flu:

The Flu Season

While seasonal influenza (flu) viruses are detected year-round in the United States, flu viruses are most common during the fall and winter. The exact timing and duration of flu seasons can vary, but influenza activity often begins to increase in October. Most of the time flu activity peaks between December and February, although activity can last as late as May.

The figure below shows peak flu activity in the United States by month for the 1982-1983 through 2017-2018 flu seasons. The “peak month of flu activity” is the month with the highest percentage of respiratory specimens(https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/overview.htm) testing positive for influenza virus infection during that influenza season. During this 36-year period, flu activity most often peaked in February (15 seasons), followed by December (7 seasons), January (6 seasons) and March (6 seasons).

Peak Month of Flu Activity
1982-1983 through 2017-2018

Flu Peak Activity Chart

When is the flu season in the United States?

In the United States, flu season occurs in the fall and winter. While influenza viruses circulate year-round, most of the time flu activity peaks(https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/season/flu-season.htm) between December and February, but activity can last as late as May. The overall health impact (e.g., infections, hospitalizations, and deaths) of a flu season varies from season to season. CDC collects, compiles, and analyzes information on influenza activity year-round in the United States and produces FluView(https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/index.htm), a weekly surveillance report, and FluView Interactive(https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/fluviewinteractive.htm), which allows for more in-depth exploration of influenza surveillance data.  The Weekly U.S. Influenza Summary Update(https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/summary.htm) is updated each week from October through May.

How does CDC monitor the progress of the flu season?

The overall health impact (e.g., infections, hospitalizations, and deaths) of a flu season varies from season to season. CDC collects, compiles, and analyzes information on influenza activity year-round in the United States and produces FluView(https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/index.htm), a weekly surveillance report, and FluView Interactive(https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/fluviewinteractive.htm), which allows for more in-depth exploration of influenza surveillance data. The Weekly U.S. Influenza Summary Update(https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/summary.htm) is updated each week from October through May.  The U.S. influenza surveillance system(https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/overview.htm) is a collaborative effort between CDC and its many partners in state and local health departments, public health and clinical laboratories, vital statistics offices, health care providers, and clinics and emergency departments. Information in five categories is collected from eight different data sources that allow CDC to:

  • Find out when and where influenza activity is occurring
  • Track influenza-related illness
  • Determine what influenza viruses are circulating
  • Detect changes in influenza viruses
  • Measure the impact influenza is having on hospitalizations and deaths in the United States

These surveillance components allow CDC to determine when and where influenza activity is occurring, determine what types of influenza viruses are circulating, detect changes in the influenza viruses collected and analyzed, track patterns of influenza-related illness, and measure the impact of influenza in the United States. All influenza activity reporting by states, laboratories, and health care providers is voluntary. For more information about CDC’s influenza surveillance activities, see the Overview of Influenza Surveillance in the United States(https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/overview.htm).

Why is there a week-long lag between the data and when it’s reported?

Influenza surveillance data collection is based on a reporting week that starts on Sunday and ends on the following Saturday of each week. Each surveillance participant is requested to summarize the weekly data and submit it to CDC by the following Tuesday afternoon. The data are then downloaded, compiled, and analyzed at CDC. The data are used to update FluView(https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/index.htm) and FluView Interactive(https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/fluviewinteractive.htm) on the following Friday.

Do other respiratory viruses circulate during the flu season?

In addition to flu viruses, several other respiratory viruses also circulate during the flu season and can cause symptoms and illness similar to those seen with flu infection. These respiratory viruses include rhinovirus (one cause of the “common cold”) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)(https://www.cdc.gov/surveillance/nrevss/index.html), which is the most common cause of severe respiratory illness in young children as well as a leading cause of death from respiratory illness in those aged 65 years and older.

 

DHS. WISCONSIN.GOV

FACT SHEET ON OUR NEW WEBSITE

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services has upgraded our website to better serve Wisconsin citizens. Our agency meets many different needs-but as a whole we are here to protect and promote the health and safety of the people of Wisconsin. A modern, well‐designed, and more responsive website will help us to achieve that.

We are using a web development tool called Drupal that has been adopted widely across both business and government. Drupal is an open source web content management system with an active development community. In other words, it is a free tool for building websites that has caught on as a practical and innovative solution worldwide.

The user experience is extremely important to us, and this upgrade has allowed us to greatly improve it.

**We studied how people navigate and why they come to   the website-and applied what we learned. Overall, visitors to our website should find it less complicated to browse, search, and find what they want.

**We are also using best practices for design. The new look is uncluttered and easier on the user's eyes.

**Our website is now optimized for mobile, which means you can view our site on any device with ease.

**We continue our ongoing agency commitment to accessibility and compliance with federal regulation, sec

 

Our Mission

The Iron County Wisconsin Health Department is here to serve the residents of Iron County Wisconsin by promoting health, protecting the enviroment, and preventing disease and injury.

 

 

 

 

Office Information

Department Head: Katie Hampston, BSN, RN
Address:
502 Copper Street
Suite 2
Hurley, WI 54534
Phone: 715-561-2191
Toll Free: 888-561-2191
Fax: 715-561-2836
Office Hours: 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM
   

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