Friday, August 17, 2018
   
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Sun Safety

The sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays can damage your skin in as little as 15 minutes. Follow these recommendations to help protect yourself and your family.

Shade

You can reduce your risk of skin damage and skin cancer by seeking shade under an umbrella, tree, or other shelter before you need relief from the sun. Your best bet to protect your skin is to use sunscreen or wear protective clothing when you’re outside—even when you’re in the shade.

Clothing

When possible, long-sleeved shirts and long pants and skirts can provide protection from UV rays. Clothes made from tightly woven fabric offer the best protection. A wet T-shirt offers much less UV protection than a dry one, and darker colors may offer more protection than lighter colors. Some clothing certified under international standards comes with information on its ultraviolet protection factor.

If wearing this type of clothing isn’t practical, at least try to wear a T-shirt or a beach cover-up. Keep in mind that a typical T-shirt has an SPF rating lower than 15, so use other types of protection as well.

Hat

For the most protection, wear a hat with a brim all the way around that shades your face, ears, and the back of your neck. A tightly woven fabric, such as canvas, works best to protect your skin from UV rays. Avoid straw hats with holes that let sunlight through. A darker hat may offer more UV protection.

If you wear a baseball cap, you should also protect your ears and the back of your neck by wearing clothing that covers those areas, using a broad spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 15, or by staying in the shade.

Sunglasses

Sunglasses protect your eyes from UV rays and reduce the risk of cataracts. They also protect the tender skin around your eyes from sun exposure.

Sunglasses that block both UVA and UVB rays offer the best protection. Most sunglasses sold in the United States, regardless of cost, meet this standard. Wrap-around sunglasses work best because they block UV rays from sneaking in from the side.

Photo of a woman putting sunscreen to her young daughter. Put on broad spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 15 before you go outside, even on slightly cloudy or cool days.

Sunscreen

Put on broad spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 15 before you go outside, even on slightly cloudy or cool days. Don’t forget to put a thick layer on all parts of exposed skin. Get help for hard-to-reach places like your back. And remember, sunscreen works best when combined with other options to prevent UV damage.

How sunscreen works. Most sunscreen products work by absorbing, reflecting, or scattering sunlight. They contain chemicals that interact with the skin to protect it from UV rays. All products do not have the same ingredients; if your skin reacts badly to one product, try another one or call a doctor.

SPF. Sunscreens are assigned a sun protection factor (SPF) number that rates their effectiveness in blocking UV rays. Higher numbers indicate more protection. You should use a broad spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 15.

Reapplication. Sunscreen wears off. Put it on again if you stay out in the sun for more than two hours and after swimming, sweating, or toweling off.

Expiration date. Check the sunscreen’s expiration date. Sunscreen without an expiration date has a shelf life of no more than three years, but its shelf life is shorter if it has been exposed to high temperatures.

Cosmetics. Some makeup and lip balms contain some of the same chemicals used in sunscreens. If they do not have at least SPF 15, don't use them by themselves.

 

Healthy and Safe Swimming

 

Boy in swimming pool

Pools, hot tubs(https://www.cdc.gov/features/healthy-swimming-year-round/index.html), and water playgrounds(https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/swimming/swimmers/water-play-areas-interactive-fountains.html) are great places to have fun, be active, or just relax. Learn how to stay healthy and safe when in the water this summer!

Swimming is one of the most popular sports activities in the United States. Just 2.5 hours of physical activity per week, including water-based activity, has health benefits(https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/swimming/swimmers/health_benefits_water_exercise.html), no matter our age. As with any form of physical activity, we maximize the health benefits of swimming when we each do our part to minimize the chance of illness and injury.

Swim Healthy, Stay Healthy!

Swimming is a fun and a great way to stay healthy and spend time with family and friends. However, it’s important not to swim or let your kids swim if they have diarrhea. Just one diarrheal incident in the water can release millions of diarrhea-causing germs like Crypto (short for Cryptosporidium(https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/crypto/)), Giardia(https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/giardia/index.html), Shigella(https://www.cdc.gov/shigella/), norovirus(https://www.cdc.gov/norovirus/), and E. coli O157:H7(https://www.cdc.gov/ecoli/index.html). This can make other swimmers sick if they swallow a mouthful of contaminated water.

Healthy and Safe Swimming Week May 21- 27, 2018

Heading to the pool this summer? Help ensure healthy and safe swimming experiences for everyone by following simple steps(https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/swimming/swimmers/steps-healthy-swimming.html).

Most germs are killed within minutes by common pool disinfectants like chlorine or bromine, but Crypto is a germ that can survive in properly chlorinated water for more than 7 days. This is why Crypto is the leading cause of outbreaks  linked to swimming in the United States.

Tips for Healthy Swimming

Practicing healthy swimming is important to keep ourselves and our loved ones healthy. Whether in the pool, the hot tub/spa, or water playground we can all help protect ourselves and our loved ones from germs by following these simple but effective steps:

  • Don’t swim or let children swim when sick with diarrhea.
  • Don’t swallow the water.
  • Take kids on bathroom breaks every hour.
  • Check diapers, and change them in a bathroom or diaper-changing area—not poolside—to keep germs away from the pool.
  • Shower before you get in the water. Rinsing off in the shower for just 1 minute helps get rid of any germs that might be on your body.

Prevent Injury

Staying safe in and around the water is important, too. Don’t forget sun safety(https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/basic_info/sun-safety.htm) and drowning prevention(https://www.cdc.gov/SafeChild/Drowning/index.html). Drowning is a leading cause of unintentional injury death among children 1–14 years old. In fact, drowning kills more young children 1–4 years old than anything else except birth defects.

Poster: Don’t swim or let your kids swim if sick with diarrhea.

Download CDC’s health promotion materials(https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/swimming/materials/index.html) to help spread the word about the importance of staying healthy and safe in the water this summer and all year long!

Of drowning victims who survive and are treated in emergency rooms, more than half are hospitalized or transferred for further care. They often experience brain damage, which can cause memory problems, learning disabilities, or permanent loss of basic functioning (or permanent vegetative state). Swimmers can prevent fatal and non-fatal drowning by learning swimming skills, by wearing life vests, and by swimming under the close supervision of parents, caregivers, or lifeguards who know cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

Remember: Think Healthy. Swim Healthy. Be Healthy! This summer and year round, let’s follow CDC’s Steps of Healthy Swimming(https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/swimming/swimmers/steps-healthy-swimming.html) to protect ourselves and our loved ones from illness and injury when swimming or playing in the water.

 

SUMMER SAFETY TIPS

It’s finally here... Summer! The warm beautiful weather, outdoor activities and family fun are plentiful this time of year. Unfortunately, so are the opportunities for sunburns, heat rashes, bug bites, water dangers and many more summer activity hazards. Below are five important summer safety tips to help ensure a super spectacular summer.

1. Avoid sunburns like the plague
According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, getting one blistering sunburn when you are a kid doubles your chances of developing melanoma. It goes without saying the best way to avoid a sunburn is to avoid the sun, but during the warm summer months that is near impossible, so always apply at least an SPF 15 sunscreen to exposed skin 30 minutes before exposure. Also, whenever possible, try to provide shade for your child in the form of umbrellas, loose clothing, long sleeves, light pants and wide-brimmed hats. For children under 6 months old, consult a physician before using any sunscreen.

If sunburn occurs and your child starts to feel ill, consult your pediatrician — seek immediate medical attention if your little one’s temperature reaches 105 F.

2. Swim Smart
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 800 children drown every year. That number is scary and beyond heartbreaking. For that reason, when around any body of water with young children and poor swimmers, stay within arm’s reach.

Here are a few top tips from the Red Cross on pool/water safety:

Always swim with a buddy; do not allow anyone to swim alone.

Do not trust a child’s life to another child

Have young children or inexperienced swimmers wear U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jackets around water, but do not rely on life jackets alone.

Establish rules for your family and enforce them without fail.

Safety covers and pool alarms should be added as additional layers of protection.

Teach children to always ask permission to go near water!

If you are around water and your child is missing ALWAYS check the water first. Seconds count.

Secondary drowning occurs after a child has struggled in the water. It is rare and accounts for only 1-2% of drowning cases, but still be aware that if your child has struggled in the water and swallowed water as a result, secondary drowning is possible. Look for these warning signs:

· Trouble Breathing, chest pain, or cough

· Sudden change in behavior

· Extreme Fatigue

The bottom line is that you know your child, after a near drowning incident or long day of swimming, Be aware of any sudden changes from the norm.



3.
Stay Away From Stings and Bites

With lovely, warm weather comes evil, pesky bugs. Unfortunately, bright colors and floral prints (summer colors!) attract bees and wasps, as do those sweet sticky faces and hands. If you are going to a park or area that you know will have a high concentration of bugs, bees and wasps, stick to clothing with muted light, solid colors.

If your child is stung, don’t pull out the stinger with fingers or tweezers. Scrape gently with a credit card to push the stinger out in the direction in which it entered. Once the stinger is out, make a paste out of baking soda and water, or a 0.5 percent hydrocortisone cream can provide relief.

As for insect repellents... DEET can be toxic! Repellents with 10 to 30 percent concentrations of DEET can be used on exposed skin, clothing and shoes, but do not apply it to little faces or hands. If you want to avoid DEET, the CDC recommends repellents that are made up with picaridin or oil of lemon eucalyptus, both are non-toxic and work just as well as formulas with low levels of DEET.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the CDC recommend that for children older than 2 months of age, use 10% to 30% DEET. DEET should never be used on children younger than 2 months of age.

Combination sunscreen/insect repellent products should be avoided because sunscreen needs to be reapplied every two hours, but the insect repellent should not be reapplied.

4. Overheating/dehydration/and heat rashes
The key to avoiding overheating is to stay hydrated. Never wait for your child to tell you he is thirsty. According to the AAP, your child is already dehydrated when he asks for something to drink, so offer lots of fluids both before going outside, and once your child is outside playing.

Hot, humid weather can lead to blocked sweat glands that lead to nasty rashes in the folds of your child’s skin. If this occurs, place your child in a cool, soapless bath. Dry him completely then apply cornstarch powder to the rash, and avoid unnecessary clothing. The rash should clear up in two to three days.

5. DO NOT LEAVE YOUR CHILD UNATTENDED IN THE CAR FOR A MINUTE!

Next time you are alone in your car, turn it off and count to 60. Within one minute your car can increase by ten degrees. Under no circumstance should your child be left in a car.

 

Even the very best parents and caregivers have been known to forget about a sleeping child in the backseat. A good rule of thumb is to keep a small stuffed animal in the car and every time you get in, place the small stuffed animal in your lap to remind you that your child is in the car. Or place your purse/laptop bag in the backseat with your child, so you have to get in the backseat before leaving your car. This is especially useful in the mornings. This may save your child’s life.

 

DHS. WISCONSIN.GOV

FACT SHEET ON OUR NEW WEBSITE

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services has upgraded our website to better serve Wisconsin citizens. Our agency meets many different needs-but as a whole we are here to protect and promote the health and safety of the people of Wisconsin. A modern, well‐designed, and more responsive website will help us to achieve that.

We are using a web development tool called Drupal that has been adopted widely across both business and government. Drupal is an open source web content management system with an active development community. In other words, it is a free tool for building websites that has caught on as a practical and innovative solution worldwide.

The user experience is extremely important to us, and this upgrade has allowed us to greatly improve it.

**We studied how people navigate and why they come to   the website-and applied what we learned. Overall, visitors to our website should find it less complicated to browse, search, and find what they want.

**We are also using best practices for design. The new look is uncluttered and easier on the user's eyes.

**Our website is now optimized for mobile, which means you can view our site on any device with ease.

**We continue our ongoing agency commitment to accessibility and compliance with federal regulation, sec

 

Our Mission

The Iron County Wisconsin Health Department is here to serve the residents of Iron County Wisconsin by promoting health, protecting the enviroment, and preventing disease and injury.

 

 

 

 

Office Information

Department Head: Katie Hampston, BSN, RN
Address:
502 Copper Street
Suite 2
Hurley, WI 54534
Phone: 715-561-2191
Toll Free: 888-561-2191
Fax: 715-561-2836
Office Hours: 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM
   

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